Use a Spreadsheet and Statistics to Better Understand Your Data

If you have ever studied Statistics, you may recall the importance of summarizing data and looking at how values are distributed. This tutorial covers a handful of spreadsheet formulas that will allow you to perform basic Statistics functions. Along the way, I use real-life numbers and address why the formulas and functions used are meaningful.

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How to Use Basic Math Functions in a Spreadsheet

This tutorial covers how to perform basic math operations and is aimed at beginning-level users of Excel and other similar spreadsheet programs such as LibreOffice Calc and Google Sheets.

Personally, I prefer using a spreadsheet over a calculator. The reason is simple. Spreadsheets allow me to scan for and correct typos much easier than do most calculators. This allows me to enter long series of numbers if needed.

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The Mystery of Dollar Signs in your Spreadsheet, or How Do Cells Find Each Other?

Spreadsheets allow us to point to other cells when entering formulas. This is called a reference. A reference can point to a single cell (C1) or to a range of cells (C1:C10). References can use relative location (one cell down and two to the right) or absolute (C1). This post provides an overview and examples of these two methods for specifying cell location.

Cell references are relative references by default. That is, they identify other cells based on distance in both horizontal and vertical directions. This boils down to something like two cells to the right and one cell down from my current location.

The cell A1 has a formula that references the cell C2.

The cell A1 has a formula that references the cell C2.

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